Bitter Grounds - espresso fueled ramblings

Monday, December 18, 2017

Can't really call what I do macro photography, although I generally use the macro filter on my smartphone. It's more closeup than macro. I'm saving for a nice Canon camera that will let me swap lenses. I really want a quality macro lens for those tight, upclose shots. Plus I want to shoot in Raw. I used to, but got lazy and stopped. My old digital cameras just aren't up to snuff any longer. In the meantime, I amuse myself with my little smartphone camera. I bought small point and shoot Sony the other day for my Mom to use. I'm going to take it out tomorrow and test drive it's quality. I'm going to test it on some of Toronto's architecture with a trip down to the historic First Post Office museum. I'll let you know how I fare.

Looking back on my smart photos, I'm a bit pleased with a number of them. Not the super high quality I want (yea, I'm a pixel snob at heart), but they keep me content. Spring is now firmly in the air in Toronto - bright sunny sky, snow melting and a hint of warmth in the air.  One reason I want a macro lens is pretty basic - flowers and bugs in the gardens. Toronto is a paradise of green.  I live right on the edge of the Ravine (read more about Toronto's Ravines here) and often poke around down there. If you are a fungus fan, it's a rich source for photographs, not to mention delicate little wild flowers.

Along with the vast network of trails, we have gardens galore. People turn their little post card sized front lawns into urban jungles, eschewing the usual bowling green look. Why have boring grass when you can have a riot of colour. It offers many opportunities for amateur photographers stop to admire the variety. Here's a shot from last May:

Fern unfurling in spring

I caught this on my way home from a job just off Yonge street, north of Lawrence. It was part of a slightly larger photo I cropped down for just the curled fern. Part of the problem with a smart camera is, it insists on setting the focus for you. I couldn't get it to focus on the fern head.  But, it's still nice, none the less.

So, tomorrow, off to look at architecture. I'll have a bit of a wait for flowers.

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"The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera."

- Dorothea Lange

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